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The last working fore-edge painter in the world

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This is a short video profile of Martin Frost, who might be the last remaining professional fore-edge painter in the world.

Dating back centuries, the delicate art form places intricate scenes on the side of books, cheekily hidden beneath gold gilded pages. The beautiful paintings are only visible to the trained eye, but once you unlock the secret, you’ll find pure magic.

I love the two-way paintings…you fan the book’s pages out one way it depicts one scene and if you fan them out the other, you get another scene.

Tags: art   books   Martin Frost   video
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DMack
2 days ago
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vimeo's dead if this video is on youtube
Victoria, BC
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Visualizing street orientations on an interactive map

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A screenshot from an interactive map of road orientations

Cities can look and feel very different depending on how they were planned and built, and this is especially apparent when you explore them from above, on a map. Some cities strictly align to a grid, others seem like they grew without any structure, and in some cases, patterns only appear when you examine a city more closely, with each neighborhood having their own distinct style. Could we visualize these patterns?

Seth Kadish invented one great way to do this, and recently Geoff Boeing rediscovered it. They divided 360° into a set of orientation ranges, counted how many road segments belong to each range, and produced a polar histogram that gives us a profound insight into the street pattern of each particular city:

Road orientations visualization by Seth Kadish
Detroit from City Street Orientations by Geoff Boeing

When I saw this, I was hooked instantly— what an ingenious way to look at how a city is built! But I wanted to explore more. How would such a chart look for my city, Kyiv? Or for some of my favorite but lesser known places? How would different neighbors of the same city compare? Or, on a larger scale, how would a European road network compare to the one in the US?

Extracting and processing the road data for every place of interest to generate a polar chart seemed like too much work. Could I do it on an interactive map? It turns out that this is a perfect use case for Mapbox vector maps — since the map data is there on the client, we can analyze and visualize it instantly for any place in the world. Play with the map below to see it in action!

How I built it

The full app is about 80 lines of code. After initializing the map, we set it up to update the visualization every time we move it:

map.on('load', function () {
updateOrientations();
map.on('moveend', updateOrientations);
});

In the update routine, we can fetch all the roads on the screen with a single line of code, getting the results in GeoJSON format for easy processing:

var features = map.queryRenderedFeatures({layers: ['road']});

To make sure we only visualize road segments that we actually see, not including parts of roads that go off the view, we use a tiny library called lineclip to clip every road feature to the current bounding box:

var clippedLines = [];
for (var j = 0; j < lines.length; j++) {
clippedLines.push.apply(clippedLines, lineclip(lines[j], bbox));
}

Calculating orientations and lengths for every road segment can be expensive if there are hundreds of thousands of them in our view. So we use cheap-ruler, a library for very fast approximations of geodesic calculations like this:

var ruler = cheapRuler(map.getCenter().lat);
...
for (var i = 0; i < line.length - 1; i++) {
var bearing = ruler.bearing(line[i], line[i + 1]);
var distance = ruler.distance(line[i], line[i + 1]);
...

For every road segment, we calculate the “bin” it belongs to (we have 64 bins that cover 360°) and accumulate segment lengths for every bin, while also counting every two-way road twice (in both directions):

var k0 = Math.round((bearing + 360) * numBins / 360) % numBins;
var k1 = Math.round((bearing + 180) * numBins / 360) % numBins;
bins[k0] += distance;
if (isTwoWay) bins[k1] += distance;

Finally, to get those pretty, uniform rainbow colors for all orientations on our chart, we use the sinebow function popularized by my coworker Charlie Loyd.

That’s it!

Now play with the interactive map — I spent hours exploring it, and hope you enjoy it as much as I do! Check out the full source code, and hit me up on Twitter if you have any questions!


Visualizing street orientations on an interactive map was originally published in Points of interest on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

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DMack
4 days ago
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clever!
Victoria, BC
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sending my most powerful kisses to all pregnant women fire fighers

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sending my most powerful kisses to all pregnant women fire fighers


Posted by dril on Tuesday, July 17th, 2018 2:36pm


7601 likes, 1199 retweets
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DMack
4 days ago
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Victoria, BC
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Golf is the saddest thing you could ever applaud.

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Golf is the saddest thing you could ever applaud.


Posted by HEADLINERTRON on Sunday, July 15th, 2018 2:00pm


81 likes, 12 retweets
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DMack
4 days ago
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Victoria, BC
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Well, well, well, well, well, why did Rite Aid just text you a coupon for a free dick pic?

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Well, well, well, well, well, why did Rite Aid just text you a coupon for a free dick pic?


Posted by HEADLINERTRON on Monday, July 16th, 2018 10:00pm


23 likes, 1 retweet
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DMack
4 days ago
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Victoria, BC
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All Elon Musk Has to Do Is Literally Anything Besides What He's Doing

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It is worth pointing out that Elon Musk can do and say anything that he wants. I don’t mean this in an abstract way. The man has multiple rockets, an electric car and battery storage company, owns a private jet, has hordes of fans who hang on his every word, and, until recently, had lots of earned good will for his futuristic vision for humanity.

Unlike basically all of us, he can go anywhere and do anything, talk to anyone, at a moment’s notice. What he’s chosen to do with at least some of his time recently is to pick fights with journalists, people who challenge him, and, most recently, one of the hero divers who helped rescue a soccer team of boys from a flooded cave in Thailand. Without providing any evidence whatsoever, Musk called British diver Vernon Unsworth a “pedo,” then doubled down on the attack when called out on it.

If you’re reading this article, you probably know the background; Musk very publicly offered to build a miniature submarine to help rescue the children. The children were rescued without the help of Musk’s sub, and the rescue was, or should have been, one of those feel-good moments in which a team of very brave humans did something seemingly impossible. Instead, Musk’s submarine got lots of the headlines. Unsworth, in an interview over the weekend, said Musk’s submarine was a “PR stunt” that wouldn’t have worked.

With his unfounded “pedo” comment, it’s never been more clear that Musk is playing by a different set of rules than the rest of us. Musk has spent much of the last few months saying that journalists are peddling false stories about his companies, going as far as to say that he’d be setting up a service to vet the ethics and reliability of different journalists. Meanwhile, he publicly accused a rescue diver of being a pedophile to his 22 million followers without backing that up with anything at all, let alone backing it up with the type of evidence and vetting that’d be needed to make that claim as a journalist.

Unsworth has already indicated that he may sue Musk, but there is no defamation lawsuit that could tank Musk’s business enterprises, his personal brand, or his personal wealth in any meaningful fashion. While journalists around the world know that any misstep or false claim made about a powerful person or company could be an existential risk for their publications and their livelihoods, Musk says and does whatever the hell he wants, knowing that he’s insulated by personal wealth capable of settling any defamation lawsuit and by a fanbase that is still standing behind him.

Unlike Jeff Bezos, Musk has not destroyed local businesses in creating his SpaceX and Tesla. Unlike Mark Zuckerberg and Google’s various billionaires, Musk has not based his business on selling the personal details of people around the world. Musk’s companies built new, tangible things, not software, that felt inspired by science fiction—solar-powered battery storage, space ships, electric cars. It is easy to describe to my dad what Elon Musk does: He builds cars—the fastest cars in the world. They run on batteries. He builds spaceships. He sent a car in the general direction of Mars. The vast majority of people think this is insanely cool, which is why he remains popular even now.

His companies are inspiring and easy to explain. They cement American dominance in two industries that Americans have fallen behind in, at least narratively speaking. Most people want Elon Musk to succeed.

It’s disappointing that Musk has chosen his platform to incessantly beef precisely because he can do whatever he wants. He can continue to attack everyone who criticizes him, and his businesses might still succeed. He will remain a billionaire, and he will grow increasingly divisive. There is a model for this: It's Donald Trump, it's Sheldon Adelson, it's every other powerful person that uses their platform and their wealth to attack, belittle, and take advantage of everyone else. The only thing he has to do to be the most popular businessman in the world is to do literally anything besides what he’s doing right now.



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DMack
5 days ago
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absolute skrilla corrupts absolutely
may grimes guide his heart to truth & purity
Victoria, BC
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MotherHydra
5 days ago
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Absolute bullshit from the same dinosaur-based cartels trying to take this guy down any way possible. Don't drink the hatorade. I expect nothing less from this "news" outlet. Who else has done more to push humanity forward through sheer force of financial capital? I'll go ahead and wait, maybe Gates comes in second and arguably with lesser results. Don't people see hit pieces for what they are? Manufactured outrage does what it says on the tin.
Space City, USA
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